Category Archives: Uncategorized

CANADA Needs Nurses: Why Nigerians Need to Study Nursing in Canada.

Category : Uncategorized

According to the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA), Canada is on track to have a shortage of 60,000 nurses by the year 2022. Several decades of budget cuts, combined with a failure of nursing employment to keep up with hospital demand has put Canada in the dangerous position of experiencing a severe lack of nursing professionals. A shortage of nurses could result in a lack of quality in Canadian healthcare services, unless action is taken to increase the number of nurses.

One strategy identified for addressing the shortage in nurses is through immigration. By bringing foreign nurses to Canada, the country will be able to improve health services for all Canadians. There are a range of immigration programs available to overseas nurses who want to come to Canada and launch their careers in healthcare!

Canada offers a Nursing programme that can train excellent future nurses at an affordable price of tuition. Throughout your education, you will be able to learn all the skills necessary for every nurse. You will have access to the best professors, new and upgraded labs, and unique learning opportunities.

The Nursing Programme is built with efficiency in mind. The knowledge provided to students is organised in a logical order (from simple to more complex), new skills are taught on the basis of previously learned knowledge. Each student has an opportunity to learn at their own pace.

The Nursing programme in Canada offers a wide variety of exciting and unique clinical opportunities at different hospitals, clinics and care facilities.

During the four-year undergraduate programme, future nurses will be able to take in knowledge and skills that will allow them to face everyday challenges. They will be able to contribute their expertise to the development of a healthy community.

Canada wants students because Canada is all about nation-building. Young, intelligent newcomers who have proven they have the credentials and means to assimilate are a big part of that. In short, Canada wants students to come here, study, contribute socially and economically, and stay permanently. Here are some of the benefits you enjoy when you study in Canada:

  • Affordable Fees: Canada is often the preferred choice for students who may also have the option of studying in countries such as the United States or United Kingdom because of the lower tuition costs. Compared to other countries, Canadian international tuition fees, accommodation and other living expenses remain competitive.
  • Work & Study Option: Students in Canada have the advantage of being able to work while studying. Among other benefits, this allows them to manage their finances without incurring enormous debt.
  • Family Relocation: One of the greatest benefits for international students in Canada is that they are eligible to bring their families with them. While in Canada, your spouse would be eligible for an open work permit. So while you’re studying, he or she can work full- or part-time for any employer in Canada. International students are also eligible to bring their dependent children with them while they study as well.
  • Possibility to work in Canada after graduation and get PR: International students who have graduated from a Canadian university or college have the opportunity to work in Canada after they receive their degree or diploma. International students can work on campus also during their studies. Most of the students are interested in working with Canadian companies for their better future. After gaining work experience, one can apply for PR to become Canadian citizen.

14 Hilarious Reasons Why People Go To The Doctor

Category : Uncategorized

We understand that you might have legitimate concerns about your health…but do you really need to go to the doctor to ask them if you can fart without making noise? It is a part of life people, deal with it. If you think you are a hypochondriac then these people’s concerns will make you feel a whole lot better.

1. Are you sure that’s the right choice?

Doctor Questions EMGN9

2. Uhm eight avocados would ruin any person even if they weren’t allergic.

Doctor Questions EMGN4

3. “I’m sorry but you are going to have to live with this terrible affliction.”

Doctor Questions EMGN6

4. Hahaha poor child, bahaha.

Doctor Questions EMGN8

5. This is called adulthood.

Doctor Questions EMGN7

6. Now that’s a puzzle.

Doctor Questions EMGN10

7. Well, no.

Doctor Questions EMGN11

8. “Aaaaand….oh there is no “and”…oh that was the end of your story?”

Doctor Questions EMGN5

9. “I thought I could talk to you about anything, doctor.”

Doctor Questions EMGN12

10. Doctors aren’t supposed to judge!

Doctor Questions EMGN2

11. It really hurts.

Doctor Questions EMGN13

12. Now that’s a pickle.

Doctor Questions EMGN14

13. OK…

Doctor Questions EMGN3

14. “And your problem is…?”

Doctor Questions EMGN1

Source


The Challenges in Nigeria Nursing Practice and Profession

Category : Uncategorized

The Challenges in Nigeria Nursing Practice and Profession… Part 1 By Saka, Abiodun J. (RGN).

According to nursing times, Nursing seems to be facing more challenges and changes than ever before. The challenges of nursing profession are enormous but it will be unwise to say that challenges only occur in nursing profession. Every institution and profession do have their own challenges too.
A wise man once said that “Change is hard at first. Messy in the middle and gorgeous at the end”. As nursing practice is in a phase of change from the obsolete way of practice to the new more theoretically, technologically and practically advanced mode of practice, it is therefore a must for it to have various challenges.
John Obadiya wrote on his blog that “The greatest challenge to nursing practice is the nurse herself, nurses in contemporary Nigeria are less caring, committed and dedicated to meeting the needs of clients. Most nurses are resistant to change, professional development and advancement “. Although, I am not agreeing totally with the above statement, some part of it are true.
In nursing practice and education, some nurses tend to hold on to previous knowledge and skills without making efforts to improve and maintain new skills. Many nurses are not willing to accept the challenges of staying abreast with education and development of new skills in their areas of nursing practice.
For nursing practice in Nigeria to develop, the Nurses must first rededicate their commitment to the professional ethics of nursing which is to acknowledge that their primary commitment in the profession is to the welfare of the client, regardless of the the clients’s status and also to participate in the development of the profession through continuous education, research and clinical studies.
We nurses need re-orientation about our attitude to practice, profession, society and clients; and then eradicate our resistance to change and global professional, clinical, technological, and theoretical advancement.
Culled from “Challenges, Prospect and Contemporary Issues in Nigerian Nursing Practice”

6 Top Doctors Reveal What You Need To Know During Your Residency

Category : Uncategorized

As you warm up to life as a medical resident, you are learning that practicing medicine is only part science. Some lessons cannot be gleaned from a textbook or lecture.
[​IMG]
To offer new medical residents insight on the intangible aspects of practice, AMA Wire® spoke with some of the nation’s top physicians about the lessons they wish they had known as new residents. Here is their top medical residency advice.

Take advantage of your opportunities

“I didn’t know what I was looking for in a residency or a fellowship because I didn’t understand how the world worked,” said Barbara L. McAneny, MD, a board-certified medical oncologist/hematologist from Albuquerque, New Mexico, who became the 173rd president of the AMA in June.

“I knew nothing about how health care was structured or where I would fit in it,” she said. “I just chose the specialty that appealed to me both for the science and the heart, and I really lucked out that oncology turned out to be such a great career.

“I wish I had done an MBA or a law degree and studied health policy,” Dr. McAneny said. “How I would have fit that in, I have no idea, but it would have been very useful. That said, if you decide to go this route, don’t let an advanced degree program mold you away from creative thinking about health systems.”

You succeed with support

“‘You don’t know what you don’t know’ is something I’ve learned over the years, and that insight would have been helpful as a resident,” said Ronald Vender, MD, professor of medicine and chief medical officer at Yale Medicine.

“That’s one important reason to develop close working relationships with nursing colleagues,” Dr. Vender added. “An experienced nurse often knows far more than a junior resident, and often has better developed clinical instincts. It also would have allowed me to ask more questions rather than think I had to find all of the answers myself.”

Voice your concerns

“A focus of our work is building and sustaining a culture of safety in health care where people—including all levels of staff as well as patients and their loved ones—feel comfortable raising concerns and asking questions,” said Tejal Gandhi, MD, chief clinical and safety officer at the Institute for Healthcare Improvement in Boston.

“During my residency, the times were different,” she noted. “We weren’t necessarily encouraged to speak up when something seemed unsafe. I wish I had known from day one the importance of our voice, and how critical it is for anyone on the care team with a safety concern to speak up about it, regardless of rank.”

Embrace uncertainty

“When I started my residency in internal medicine and pediatrics, I was unaware of what I ultimately wanted to do in medicine,” said Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, MPH, MPA, an obesity medicine physician scientist at Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

“I did not feel as though I had anyone’s footsteps in which I wanted to follow,” she said. “This created a certain level of angst, but I would recommend residents take it a day at a time. Soon after this initial angst, I decided to navigate a new path in obesity medicine. As one of the first fellowship-trained physicians in the field, I am glad that I followed the parts of medicine that brought me joy.”

Practice self-care

“I wish someone would have given me a talk or lecture on how to manage my time and life—how to get more sleep and rest, and how to learn to be happy,” said Bennet Omalu, MD, MPH, a forensic pathologist who discovered chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

“I did not know any better, so I defined my life by my work and professional attainments,” he said. “That was a total disaster for me, eventually—my depression got worse. At some point, I actually began to exhibit self-destructive behavior.

“It was only after my residency that I realized I had to redefine and reorient my life and begin to learn how to be happy outside my work.”

Grow your knowledge every day

“The habits of mind one creates and nurtures during residency will pay dividends through a lifetime of practice,” said Robert Wachter, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine.

“The key one, which is particularly challenging during internship, when one is trying to survive each day, is to strive to learn one new thing related to one of the patients on the team, each and every day,” he said. “This can be by looking up an article or a summary paper or by talking to a consultant. This habit will lead to tremendous growth in fund of knowledge and clinical sophistication, and also pave the way to continue learning throughout your professional lifetime.”

Source


Full List of All Accredited Nursing Schools in Nigeria

Category : Uncategorized

Below is the complete list of all the Nursing Schools in Nigeria accredited by the Nursing and Midwifery Council of Nigeria.

ABIA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba
  • School of Nursing, Umuahia.
  • School of Nursing, Amachara
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Umuahia
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Abia State University Teaching Hospital, Aba
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Abiriba
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Aba.
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Amachara
  • School of Nursing, Abia State University, Uturu

ADAMAWA STATE

  • College of Nursing & Midwifery, Dept. of Nursing, Yola
  • College of Nursing & Midwifery, Dept of Midwifery

AKWA-IBOM STATE

  • School of Nursing, Anua-Uyo.
  • School of Nursing, Eket
  • School of Nursing, Ikot-Ekpene
  • School of Nursing Ituk-Mbang.
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Eket
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Anua-Uyo
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Iquita-Oron
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Ituk-Mbang
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Urua-Akpan

AKWA-IBOM STATE

  • School of Nursing, Ihiala
  • School of Nursing, Iyi-Enu
  • School of Nursing, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital, Nnewi
  • School of Nursing, Odumegwu Ojukwu University Teaching Hospital, Nkpor
  • School of Basic Midwifery,Adazi
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Odumegwu Ojukwu University Teaching Hospital, Nkpor
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Ihiala.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Iyi-Enu.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Waterside, Onitsha
  • School of Nursing, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nnewi.

BAUCHI STATE

  • School of Nursing, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa Teaching Hospital, Bauchi
  • School of Basic Midwifery Abubakar Tafawa Balewa Teaching Hospital, Bauchi
  • Community Midwifery Programme-School of Basic Midwifery, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa Teaching Hospital, Bauchi

BAYELSA STATE

  • School of Nursing School of Nursing, Tombia
  • School of Nursing, Niger Delta University, Wilberforce Island

BENUE STATE

  • School of Nursing Makurdi.
  • School of Nursing, Mkar
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Makurdi
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Mkar.

BORNO STATE

  • School of Nursing Maiduguri
  • School of Nursing, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Maiduguri
  • School of Post Basic Nursing Peri-Operative, University of Maiduguri Teaching Hospital, Maiduguri
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Maiduguri.
  • School of Nursing, University Of Maiduguri.

CROSS RIVER STATE

  • School of Nursing Calabar.
  • School of Nursing, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital
  • School of Nursing, Itigidi.
  • School of Nursing, Ogoja.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Calabar
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Obudu.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Ogoja
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, E.N.T. University of Calabar Teaching Hospital
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Fed. Neuro Psy. Hosp., Calabar
  • School of Nursing, University Of Calabar

DELTA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Agbor
  • School of Nursing, Eku
  • School of Nursing, Warri
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Asaba.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Sapele
  • School of Nursing, Delta State University, Abraka

EBONYI STATE

  • School of Nursing, Afikpo
  • School of Nursing, FETHA
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Afikpo
  • School of Basic Midwifery, FETHA
  • Dept, Of Nursing, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki\

EDO STATE

  • School of Nursing, Benin City.
  • School of Nursing, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin
  • School of Nursing, Igbinedion University Teaching Hospital, Okada
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery U.B.T.H. Benin-City.
  • School of Post Basic Paediatric Nursing, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin
  • School of Post Basic Ophthalmic Nursing, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin
  • School of Post Basic Peri- Operative Nursing, University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin
  • School of Post Basic Peri- Operative Nursing, Irrua Specialist Hospital, Irrua
  • School of Post Basic Nursing A&E. U.B.T.H. Benin
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Uselu.
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Benin-City
  • School of Basic Midwifery, St. Philo’s Hosp. Benin-City.
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Uromi
  • School of Basic Midwifery. Zuma Memorial Hosp. Irrua.
  • Dept of Nursing, University of Benin
  • School of Nursing, Igbinedion University, Okada

EKITI STATE

  • School of Nursing, Ado-Ekiti.
  • School of Nursing, Ido-Ekiti.
  • School of Post Basic, Midwifery Ado-Ekiti
  • School Of Nursing, Afe Babalola University, Ekiti

ENUGU STATE

  • School of Nursing, Bishop Shanahan Hospital, Nsukka.
  • School of Nursing, Enugu State University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Parklane, Enugu
  • School of Nursing, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Shanahan Hospital, Nsukka
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Enugu State University of Technology Teaching Hospital, Parklane, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Cardiothoracic, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Anaesthetics, Enugu State University Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Ophthalmic, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Burns & Plastic, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Peri- Operative Nursing, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Post Basic Orthopaedic Nursing, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Enugu
  • School of Nursing, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus

GOMBE STATE

  • School of Nursing Gombe
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Gombe

IMO STATE

  • School of Nursing, Amaigbo
  • School of Nursing, Emekuku
  • School of Nursing, Mbano
  • School of Nursing, Owerri
  • School of Nursing Umulogho, Obowu
  • College of Nursing & Health, Orlu
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Aboh Mbaise
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Awo-Omamma
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Emekuku
  • School of Nursing, Imo State University, Owerri.

JIGAWA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Birnin-Kudu
  • School of Basic Midwifery. Birnin-Kudu

KADUNA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Ahamadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria
  • College Of Nursing, Kafanchan
  • School of Nursing St. Gerald’s Hospital, Kakuri.
  • School of Nursing, Wusasa.
  • School of Basic Midwifery. Tundan Wada
  • School of Basic Midwifery. Zonkwa
  • College of Basic Midwifery, Kafanchan.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Ahamadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery Wusasa
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Ophthalmic Nursing, Ahamadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Paediatric, Ahamadu Bello University Teaching Hospital, Zaria
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Ear Nose and Throat, Kaduna.
  • School of Post Basic Ophthalmic Nursing , Kaduna National Eye Centre
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Barnawa, Kaduna
  • School Of Nursing, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria

KANO STATE

  • School of Nursing, Kano.
  • School of Nursing, Madobi
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Danbatta, Kano
  • Community Midwifery Programme, School of Basic Midwifery, Danbatta, Kano
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Kano.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Gezawa
  • School of Post Basic Orthopaedic Nursing, National Hospital, Dala –Kano
  • School of Post Basic Paediatric Nursing, AKTH
  • School of Nursing. Sc. FAHS, Bayero University Kano.

KASTINA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Katsina.
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Malumfashi
  • Community Midwifery Programme, School of Basic Midwifery, Malumfashi

KEBBI STATE

  • School of Nursing, Birnin-Kebbi
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Birnin-Kebbi.

KOGI STATE

  • School of Nursing, Obangede.
  • School of Nursing, Egbe.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Anyigba
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Egbe

KWARA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Ilorin.
  • School of Nursing, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital
  • College Of Nursing, Oke-Ode
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Ilorin.
  • School of Post Basic Nursing A. &E. University of Ilorin
  • School of Post Basic Nursing Paediatric, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin

LAGOS STATE

  • School of Nursing, Igando.
  • School of Nursing, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba
  • School of Nursing, Military Hospital, Yaba KEBBI STATE
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Igando
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Idi-Araba
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Military Hospital, Yaba
  • School of Post Basic A&E Nursing, Lagos University Teaching Hospital
  • School of Post Basic Paediatric Nursing, Lagos University Teaching Hospital
  • School of Post Basic Ophthalmic Nursing, Lagos University Teaching Hospital
  • School of Post Basic Peri- Operative Nursing, Lagos University Teaching Hospital
  • School of Post Basic A&E Nursing, National Orthopaedic Hospital, Igbobi, Lagos
  • School of Post Basic Orthopaedic Nursing, NOH. Igbobi, Lagos
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Federal Neuropsychiatric, Yaba.
  • DEPT OF NSG. SC. UNILAG.

NASAWARA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Lafia

NIGER STATE

  • School of Nursing, Bida.
  • School of Basic Midwifery. Minna.

OGUN STATE

  • School of Nursing, Abeokuta.
  • School of Nursing, Ijebu-Ode.
  • School of Nursing, Ilaro.
  • School of Nursing, Lantoro.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Abeokuta.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Ijebu-Ode.
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Aro, Abeokuta
  • School of Nursing, Babcock University, Illishan-Remo

ONDO STATE

  • School of Nursing, Akure.
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Akure.

OSUN STATE

  • School of Nursing, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ilesa
  • School of Nursing, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile- Ife
  • School of Nursing, Osogbo.
  • School of Nursing, Seventh Day Adventist Hospital, Ile-Ife
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital, Ilesa
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Osogbo
  • School of Post Basic Peri- Operative Nursing, Obafemi Awolowo University Teaching Hospital Complex, Ile-Ife
  • School of Nursing, Ladoke Akintola University Of Technology, Osogbo
  • School Of Nursing, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife

OYO STATE

  • School of Nursing, Baptist Medical Centre, Saki
  • School of Nursing, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomosho
  • College of Nursing and Midwifery, Dept. of Nursing, Eleyele, Ibadan
  • School of Nursing, University College Hospital, Ibadan
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Muslim Hospital, Saki
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Baptist Medical Centre, Saki.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Oluyoro, Ibadan.
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, University College Hospital, Ibadan.
  • College of Nursing and Midwifery Dept. of Post Basic Midwifery, Eleyele, Ibadan
  • School of Post Basic Nursing, Occupational Health, University College Hospital, Ibadan
  • School of Post Basic Peri-Operative Nursing, University College Hospital, Ibadan
  • School Of Nursing, University of Ibadan

PLATEAU STATE

  • School of Nursing, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos (MMH)
  • School of Nursing, Vom, Jos
  • School of Basic Midwifery., Vom, Jos
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos (MMH)
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Our Lady of Apostles, Jos.
  • School of Post Basic Anaesthetic Nursing, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos
  • School of Post Basic Critical Care Nursing, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos
  • School Of Nursing, University Of Jos.

RIVERS STATE

  • School of Nursing, Port- Harcourt
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Port-Harcourt
  • School of Post Basic A&E Nursing, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital
  • School of Post Basic Paediatric Nursing, University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital
  • School Of Nursing, University Of Port-Harcourt
  • School of Nursing, Madonna University, Elele.

SOKOTO STATE

  • School of Nursing, Sokoto.
  • School of Nursing, Usuman Danfodio University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Sokoto
  • Community Midwife Programme, School of Basic Midwifery, Sokoto
  • School of Post Basic Midwifery, Usuman Danfodio University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
  • School of Psychiatric Nursing, Federal Neuropsychiatric Hospital, Kware

TARABA STATE

  • School of Nursing Jalingo
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Jalingo

YOBE STATE

  • School of Nursing, Dr. Shehu Sule, Damaturu
  • School of Basic Midwifery. Dr. Shehu Sule, Damaturu

ZAMFARA STATE

  • School of Nursing, Gusau
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Gusau
  • Community Midwifery Programme, School of Basic Midwifery, Gusau

FCT

  • School of Nursing, Gwagwalada
  • School of Basic Midwifery, Gwagwalada
  • School of Post Basic Critical Care Nursing, University of Abuja Teaching Hospital, Abuja.

Download the Original Content Here


Roles of Community Health workers in Healthcare Delivery

Category : Uncategorized

Who Are Community Health Workers?

Community health workers (CHWs) are identified by many titles, including community health advisers, lay health advocates, Promotoras, outreach educators, community health representatives, peer health promoters and peer health educators.
This definition includes duties such as:
Assist individuals and communities to adopt healthy behaviors
Conduct outreach for medical personnel or health organizations to implement programs in the community that promote, maintain, and improve individual and community health
Provide information on available resources
Provide social support and informal counseling
Advocate for individuals and community health needs
Provide services such as first aid and blood pressure screening
May collect data to help identify community health needs
Excludes ‘Health Educators’

Frequently, community health workers (CHWs) are members of the communities they serve, and are adept at building community capacity while delivering culturally competent services. They develop trusting, one-on-one relationships with consumers/clients and providers.
Since rural communities are typically highly connected, CHWs have a greater opportunity to:
Develop relationships with consumers
Act as a liaison between providers and consumers
Gain support from other organizations serving the community
Connect consumers with needed healthcare and social support services

By contributing to the delivery of primary and preventive care, CHWs may facilitate improvements in health status and quality of life in rural communities. These impacts can be greatly increased when CHWs are fully integrated into the primary care team, working alongside physicians, nurses, and other clinic staff.
In addition, CHWs participate in community-based participatory research. For example, in one rural program, CHWs have helped to enroll community members in a study related to diabetes self-management education.

Roles of Community Health Workers

Community health workers’ (CHWs) roles and activities are tailored to meet the unique needs of their communities, and also depend on factors such as whether they work in the healthcare or social services sectors. Generally, their roles include:
Creating connections between vulnerable populations and healthcare systems
Managing care and care transitions for vulnerable populations
Determining eligibility and enrolling individuals into health insurance plans
Ensuring cultural competence among healthcare professionals serving vulnerable populations
Providing culturally appropriate health education on topics related to chronic disease prevention, physical activity and nutrition
Advocating for underserved individuals to receive appropriate services
Providing informal counseling
Building capacity to address health issues
More specific roles are dependent on:
Services provided
Advocacy
Outreach
Education
Clinical services
Required skills
Communication
Cultural competence
Training
Professional experiences
Education

The Benefits of Using CHWs to Deliver Care

According to Allies for Quality, lay health workers comprised of local community members have certain advantages over other healthcare workers. For example, they can more easily communicate with and gain trust from their patients; they can develop culturally relevant and highly accessible health materials and information; they can help adapt the health care system to better suit their population’s needs; and they can be cost-effective extensions of the healthcare system. With these capacities, CHWs “can successfully engage significant numbers of consumers in increasing knowledge and reducing barriers to health care quality.” Moreover, the founders of the Comprehensive Rural Health Project in Jamkhed “found that lack of education was an advantage for village health workers. They knew how their neighbors lived and thought.” Serving as trusted liaisons between communities and the formal healthcare system, CHWs can provide invaluable progress in the removal of barriers to healthcare.

In addition, in regards to HIV/AIDS, “Community health workers as a community-based extension of health services are essential for antiretroviral treatment scale-up and comprehensive primary health care. The renewed attention to community health workers is thus very welcome, but the scale-up of community health worker programmes runs a high risk of neglecting the necessary quality criteria if it is not aligned with broader health systems strengthening. To achieve universal access to antiretroviral treatment, this is of paramount importance and should receive urgent attention.”


60-year old nigerian woman gives birth through IVF

Category : Uncategorized

There is good news for women who think age is a barrier to conception.

A woman said to be 60 has just been delivered of a baby at a Lagos hospital.

For 31 years, Mrs Omolara Irurhe was globetrotting not for pleasure but in search of a child.   She was a guest in the best hospitals.

But in 2010, her journey ended in the most unlikely hospital and country when she began an Invitro Fertilization (IVF) treatment at the St. Ives Hospital in Lagos. On Monday, what began as a seed hope four years ago culminated in the delievery of a bouncing baby girl.

Mrs. Irurhe  becomes the oldest IVF mother in Africa. The global recognition for oldest IVF delivery goes to Rajo Deri Lohan, an Indian who in 2008 was delivered of a baby at 69 years.

The IVF Unit at St. Ives Hospital successfully aided the conception and delivery of the baby and has now equaled the United Kingdom’s record of IVF age delivery.

The team of doctors at the hospital was led by the Chief Medical Director, Dr. Tunde Okewale, who expressed joy at the successful delivery. Okewale said the physical condition of the mother – and not just the age – is a major factor that determines the success of conception and delivery through IVF.

“We treat only after strict medical check of couples. For us, age is not important in our decision to take her on; what was important is the physical condition of the mother. Older women generally make better patients in our experience,” Okewale said.

When The Nation spoke to the new mother, she was full of enthusiasm and joy over her new baby. She said what kept her going after many years of childlessness was faith in God and a belief in herself.

Mrs. Irurhe said she had tried to have a baby for many years and had gone to many hospitals both within and outside the country for a solution to her childlessness. But in 2010, her journey came to an end when she was introduced to St. Ives Hospital and the treatment began.

“I believe we should not limit God and what the doctors can do in this modern age. I believe this is the appointed time. I was very hopeful throughout the years I was childless and I remained focused on God. We went to many hospitals but we didn’t give up,” she said.

The joyful mother said her husband’s Catholic faith prevented him from marrying a second wife as the two of them put their faith in God.


Only one in 48 applicants will get admission to study medicine in Nigerian universities.

Category : Uncategorized

Only one in 48 applicants will get admission to study medicine in Nigerian universities in this year’s academic session due to limited vacancies, Daily Trust investigations have shown.

Joint Admission and Matriculation Board (JAMB) data shows that 156,213 students sat for the 2017 Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examinations (UTME) to read medicine whereas there are only 3,205 vacancies in 44 universities across the country.

There are 37 medical and nine dental colleges in the country, according to information on the official website of the Medical and Dental Council of Nigeria (MDCN).

Six medical and two dental colleges have partial accreditation, the MDCN website said.

The colleges are to produce 2,550 medical and 175 dental doctors annually, according to the council’s website.

MDCN is a federal body that regulates training in Medicine, Dentistry and Alternative Medicine as well as the regulation and control of Laboratory Medicine in Nigeria.

Fewer vacancies, mass applicants

JAMB data shows that 31 accredited medical colleges in the southern part of the country received 95,869 applications but they have a combined approved slots of 2,260 received

There are 12 accredited medical colleges in the north with 945 approved slots, but they received 57, 024 applications this year.

In the Federal Capital Territory, 3,227 applied to the University of Abuja and 93 to the Nigeria Turkish Nile University, Abuja.

Five accredited colleges in the North-central (Makurdi, Ilorin, Jos, Keffi, and Ayingba) have 400 approved total slots but 21,992 candidates applied.

In the North-east, three accredited medical colleges in Maiduguri, Bauchi, and Gombe have 265 approved slots even though 9,970 students have applied this year.

The North-west’s four accredited colleges in Kano, Kaduna, Sokoto, and Zaria with approved vacancies of 330 received 25,062 applications.

The South-east has nine accredited universities: Abia (2), Anambra (2), Enugu (2), Imo (2) and Ebonyi, with 590 approved slots, but got applications from 25,103.

In South-west, 34,938 students applied for 910 vacancies in the 12 universities with accreditation to train medical doctors.

The nine accredited medical colleges in the South-south received 35,828 applications that will vie for 760 slots.

Shortage of doctors

Nigeria falls below the “critical threshold” of 23 doctors, nurses and midwives per 10,000 population, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) report on the density of doctors, nurses, and midwives in the 49 priority countries.

Attempts to speak to the officials of the MDCN on record for this story were not successful. The Nigerian Medical Association (NMA) couldn’t provide the number of registered doctors in the country.

But an official of the NMA who preferred not be named said there are currently 35, 000 doctors in Nigeria.

While the WHO stipulates 1:20 doctor-patient ratio, Nigeria has 1:5,200 based on its current unofficial population figure of 182 million.

But a medical doctor in the Federal Ministry of Health who spoke to this reporter on condition of anonymity because he’s not allowed to speak said Nigeria’s major problem is brain drain.

“The number of doctors graduated by medical schools is enough to take care of the population if not for internal and external brain drain,” he said. Other problems that bedevil the health sector, he said include “the dearth of facilities in medical schools, poor remuneration, shortage of tertiary institutions for housemanship and patients’ overloads.”

He said because of higher salaries, trained doctors abandoned local hospitals to take jobs with international non-governmental organizations working in the country.

Hundreds of other doctors troop abroad for better pay and conditions of service.

“It will take young doctors between one to three years after graduation searching for teaching hospitals for their housemanship.

“Another challenge is the concentration of doctors in urban areas. This is a huge problem because the majority of the population live in rural areas,” the doctor said.

What should be done

To address these challenges, the federal government should adopt the triple strategy of training, absorption and financing, Dr Obinna Ebirim, a consultant on Nigerian projects of Johns Hopkins International Vaccine Access Centre (JHU IVAC), told Daily Trust.

He said the federal government must fulfil its commitment of allocating 15 percent of its annual budget to health in line with the Abuja Declaration.

He said the absorption capacity of the existing medical colleges should be expanded by providing adequate infrastructure and manpower to enable them to train more doctors.

“Apart from that, the number of health tertiary institutions should be expanded, equipped and properly funded, so that the young doctors will be given placements to do their housemanship,” he said.

Dr Ebirim said aside from that, the health sector should adequately be financed to provide the good atmosphere for the doctors to work.

“Most of these young doctors travel abroad for greener pastures. That can only stop if there is an improvement in the remuneration packages and condition of service of doctors,” the public health advocate said.

“More interventions need to be implemented to train more, absorb more, and retain more doctors in Nigeria. We can learn from the health system in Cuba,” he said.

He said President Muhammadu Buhari’s administration’s focus on PHC revitalization, increased immunization coverage, tertiary health institution reform, automatic placement of graduate physicians, accountability and good governance in the health sector gives hope of a better for medicine in Nigeria.

“More money for health means we can pay doctors salaries commensurate with what their peers earn in those countries they run to, increase both the number and functionality of our health facilities such that practice of medicine is sweet and service delivery will improve, and cover more of our citizens with health insurance so that there is no financial demand on doctors by patients who can’t afford their bills,” he said.

Dr Ebirim, however, said beyond increased funding is the need to curb inefficiencies and corruption in the health sector. “In the past, there have been reports were doctors exit the medical residency in teaching hospitals and their names are still in the payroll system. There are also cases of how donor funding was misappropriated or stolen with the current administration made to pay. These have to stop,” he said.


Like us on Facebook

Follow us on Twitter

@WHO, strengthening health workforce for Universal Health Coverage in Nigeria. Thanks to @CanHCNigeria

#UHC
#Healthforall
#healthworkforce
#healthsystems

CANADA Needs Nurses: Why Nigerians Need to Study Nursing in #Canada. According to the Canadian Nurses Association (CNA), Canada is on track to have a shortage of 60,000 nurses by the year 2022. https://t.co/RO4SbqvoGx

#Canada offers a Nursing programme that can train excellent future nurses at an affordable price of tuition. Click here for details https://t.co/t1x6FhsJAJ or call 08144544917 to apply. #StudyNursing

BENEFITS of Studying Nursing in #Canada:
1. Affordable Fees
2. Work & Study Option
3. Family Relocation
4. Work in Canada after graduation and get Permanent Residency.

Apply today.
08144544917
https://t.co/T3ZIx97ZkG

cc: @MobilePunch @thepamilerin @OgbeniDipo @Bhadoosky

BENEFITS of Studying Nursing in #Canada:
1. Affordable Fees
2. Work & Study Option
3. Family Relocation
4. Work in Canada after graduation and get Permanent Residency.

Apply today.
08144544917
https://t.co/T3ZIx97ZkG

cc: @MobilePunch @thepamilerin @OgbeniDipo @Bhadoosky

Load More...

Contact us

ValueMedic Nigeria

70D Allen Avenue, Ikeja,
Lagos, Nigeria
Ph: +2348144544917
Ph: +2349022100534
Em: info@valuemedic.com.ng